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Multiple and independent origins of short seeded alleles of GS3 in rice.

S-McCouch PubMed Feed - Mon, 06/10/2013 - 12:45

Multiple and independent origins of short seeded alleles of GS3 in rice.

Breed Sci. 2013 Mar;63(1):77-85

Authors: Takano-Kai N, Jiang H, Powell A, McCouch S, Takamure I, Furuya N, Doi K, Yoshimura A

Abstract
GRAIN SIZE 3 (GS3) is a cloned gene that is related to seed length. Here we report the discovery of new deletion alleles at the GS3 locus, each of which confer short seed. We selected ten short seeded cultivars from a collection of 282 diverse cultivars. Sequence analysis across the GS3 gene in these ten cultivars identified three novel alleles and a known allele that contain several independent deletion(s) in the fifth exon of GS. These independent deletion variants each resulted in a frameshift mutation that caused a premature stop codon, and they were functionally similar to one another. Each coded for a truncated gene product that behaved as an incomplete dominant allele and conferred a short seeded phenotype. Haplotype analysis of these sequence variants indicated that two of the variants were of japonica origin, and two were from indica. Transformation experiments demonstrated that one of the deletion alleles of GS3 decrease the cell number in the upper epidermis of the glume, resulting in a significant reduction in seed length. The multiple and independent origins of these short seeded alleles indicate that farmers and early breeders imposed artificial selection favoring short seeds.

PMID: 23641184 [PubMed - in process]

PICARA, an analytical pipeline providing probabilistic inference about a priori candidates genes underlying genome-wide association QTL in plants.

GDeClerck_pubmed - Mon, 06/10/2013 - 12:45
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PICARA, an analytical pipeline providing probabilistic inference about a priori candidates genes underlying genome-wide association QTL in plants.

PLoS One. 2012;7(11):e46596

Authors: Chen C, DeClerck G, Tian F, Spooner W, McCouch S, Buckler E

Abstract
PICARA is an analytical pipeline designed to systematically summarize observed SNP/trait associations identified by genome wide association studies (GWAS) and to identify candidate genes involved in the regulation of complex trait variation. The pipeline provides probabilistic inference about a priori candidate genes using integrated information derived from genome-wide association signals, gene homology, and curated gene sets embedded in pathway descriptions. In this paper, we demonstrate the performance of PICARA using data for flowering time variation in maize - a key trait for geographical and seasonal adaption of plants. Among 406 curated flowering time-related genes from Arabidopsis, we identify 61 orthologs in maize that are significantly enriched for GWAS SNP signals, including key regulators such as FT (Flowering Locus T) and GI (GIGANTEA), and genes centered in the Arabidopsis circadian pathway, including TOC1 (Timing of CAB Expression 1) and LHY (Late Elongated Hypocotyl). In addition, we discover a regulatory feature that is characteristic of these a priori flowering time candidates in maize. This new probabilistic analytical pipeline helps researchers infer the functional significance of candidate genes associated with complex traits and helps guide future experiments by providing statistical support for gene candidates based on the integration of heterogeneous biological information.

PMID: 23144785 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PICARA, an analytical pipeline providing probabilistic inference about a priori candidates genes underlying genome-wide association QTL in plants.

S-McCouch PubMed Feed - Sat, 05/04/2013 - 05:45
Related Articles

PICARA, an analytical pipeline providing probabilistic inference about a priori candidates genes underlying genome-wide association QTL in plants.

PLoS One. 2012;7(11):e46596

Authors: Chen C, DeClerck G, Tian F, Spooner W, McCouch S, Buckler E

Abstract
PICARA is an analytical pipeline designed to systematically summarize observed SNP/trait associations identified by genome wide association studies (GWAS) and to identify candidate genes involved in the regulation of complex trait variation. The pipeline provides probabilistic inference about a priori candidate genes using integrated information derived from genome-wide association signals, gene homology, and curated gene sets embedded in pathway descriptions. In this paper, we demonstrate the performance of PICARA using data for flowering time variation in maize - a key trait for geographical and seasonal adaption of plants. Among 406 curated flowering time-related genes from Arabidopsis, we identify 61 orthologs in maize that are significantly enriched for GWAS SNP signals, including key regulators such as FT (Flowering Locus T) and GI (GIGANTEA), and genes centered in the Arabidopsis circadian pathway, including TOC1 (Timing of CAB Expression 1) and LHY (Late Elongated Hypocotyl). In addition, we discover a regulatory feature that is characteristic of these a priori flowering time candidates in maize. This new probabilistic analytical pipeline helps researchers infer the functional significance of candidate genes associated with complex traits and helps guide future experiments by providing statistical support for gene candidates based on the integration of heterogeneous biological information.

PMID: 23144785 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Genomics of gene banks: A case study in rice.

S-McCouch PubMed Feed - Sat, 05/04/2013 - 05:45
Related Articles

Genomics of gene banks: A case study in rice.

Am J Bot. 2012 Feb;99(2):407-23

Authors: McCouch SR, McNally KL, Wang W, Sackville Hamilton R

Abstract
Only a small fraction of the naturally occurring genetic diversity available in the world's germplasm repositories has been explored to date, but this is expected to change with the advent of affordable, high-throughput genotyping and sequencing technology. It is now possible to examine genome-wide patterns of natural variation and link sequence polymorphisms with downstream phenotypic consequences. In this paper, we discuss how dramatic changes in the cost and efficiency of sequencing and genotyping are revolutionizing the way gene bank scientists approach the responsibilities of their job. Sequencing technology provides a set of tools that can be used to enhance the quality, efficiency, and cost-effectiveness of gene bank operations, the depth of scientific knowledge of gene bank holdings, and the level of public interest in natural variation. As a result, gene banks have the chance to take on new life. Previously seen as "warehouses" where seeds were diligently maintained, but evolutionarily frozen in time, gene banks could transform into vibrant research centers that actively investigate the genetic potential of their holdings. In this paper, we will discuss how genotyping and sequencing can be integrated into the activities of a modern gene bank to revolutionize the way scientists document the genetic identity of their accessions; track seed lots, varieties, and alleles; identify duplicates; and rationalize active collections, and how the availability of genomics data are likely to motivate innovative collaborations with the larger research and breeding communities to engage in systematic and rigorous phenotyping and multilocation evaluation of the genetic resources in gene banks around the world. The objective is to understand and eventually predict how variation at the DNA level helps determine the phenotypic potential of an individual or population. Leadership and vision are needed to coordinate the characterization of collections and to integrate genotypic and phenotypic information in ways that will illuminate the value of these resources. Genotyping of collections represents a powerful starting point that will enable gene banks to become more effective as stewards of crop biodiversity.

PMID: 22314574 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Next-generation phenotyping: requirements and strategies for enhancing our understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships and its relevance to crop improvement.

S-McCouch PubMed Feed - Tue, 04/23/2013 - 05:45
Related Articles

Next-generation phenotyping: requirements and strategies for enhancing our understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships and its relevance to crop improvement.

Theor Appl Genet. 2013 Mar 8;

Authors: Cobb JN, Declerck G, Greenberg A, Clark R, McCouch S

Abstract
More accurate and precise phenotyping strategies are necessary to empower high-resolution linkage mapping and genome-wide association studies and for training genomic selection models in plant improvement. Within this framework, the objective of modern phenotyping is to increase the accuracy, precision and throughput of phenotypic estimation at all levels of biological organization while reducing costs and minimizing labor through automation, remote sensing, improved data integration and experimental design. Much like the efforts to optimize genotyping during the 1980s and 1990s, designing effective phenotyping initiatives today requires multi-faceted collaborations between biologists, computer scientists, statisticians and engineers. Robust phenotyping systems are needed to characterize the full suite of genetic factors that contribute to quantitative phenotypic variation across cells, organs and tissues, developmental stages, years, environments, species and research programs. Next-generation phenotyping generates significantly more data than previously and requires novel data management, access and storage systems, increased use of ontologies to facilitate data integration, and new statistical tools for enhancing experimental design and extracting biologically meaningful signal from environmental and experimental noise. To ensure relevance, the implementation of efficient and informative phenotyping experiments also requires familiarity with diverse germplasm resources, population structures, and target populations of environments. Today, phenotyping is quickly emerging as the major operational bottleneck limiting the power of genetic analysis and genomic prediction. The challenge for the next generation of quantitative geneticists and plant breeders is not only to understand the genetic basis of complex trait variation, but also to use that knowledge to efficiently synthesize twenty-first century crop varieties.

PMID: 23471459 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Next-generation phenotyping: requirements and strategies for enhancing our understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships and its relevance to crop improvement.

GDeClerck_pubmed - Tue, 04/23/2013 - 05:45
Related Articles

Next-generation phenotyping: requirements and strategies for enhancing our understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships and its relevance to crop improvement.

Theor Appl Genet. 2013 Mar 8;

Authors: Cobb JN, Declerck G, Greenberg A, Clark R, McCouch S

Abstract
More accurate and precise phenotyping strategies are necessary to empower high-resolution linkage mapping and genome-wide association studies and for training genomic selection models in plant improvement. Within this framework, the objective of modern phenotyping is to increase the accuracy, precision and throughput of phenotypic estimation at all levels of biological organization while reducing costs and minimizing labor through automation, remote sensing, improved data integration and experimental design. Much like the efforts to optimize genotyping during the 1980s and 1990s, designing effective phenotyping initiatives today requires multi-faceted collaborations between biologists, computer scientists, statisticians and engineers. Robust phenotyping systems are needed to characterize the full suite of genetic factors that contribute to quantitative phenotypic variation across cells, organs and tissues, developmental stages, years, environments, species and research programs. Next-generation phenotyping generates significantly more data than previously and requires novel data management, access and storage systems, increased use of ontologies to facilitate data integration, and new statistical tools for enhancing experimental design and extracting biologically meaningful signal from environmental and experimental noise. To ensure relevance, the implementation of efficient and informative phenotyping experiments also requires familiarity with diverse germplasm resources, population structures, and target populations of environments. Today, phenotyping is quickly emerging as the major operational bottleneck limiting the power of genetic analysis and genomic prediction. The challenge for the next generation of quantitative geneticists and plant breeders is not only to understand the genetic basis of complex trait variation, but also to use that knowledge to efficiently synthesize twenty-first century crop varieties.

PMID: 23471459 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Automatic generation of MedDRA terms groupings using an ontology.

GDeClerck_pubmed - Sat, 03/09/2013 - 05:45
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Automatic generation of MedDRA terms groupings using an ontology.

Stud Health Technol Inform. 2012;180:73-7

Authors: Declerck G, Bousquet C, Jaulent MC

Abstract
In the context of PROTECT European project, we have developed an ontology of adverse drug reactions (OntoADR) based on the original MedDRA hierarchy and a query-based method to achieve automatic MedDRA terms groupings for improving pharmacovigilance signal detection. Those groupings were evaluated against standard handmade MedDRA groupings corresponding to first priority pharmacovigilance safety topics. Our results demonstrate that this automatic method allows catching most of the terms present in the reference groupings, and suggest that it could offer an important saving of time for the achievement of pharmacovigilance groupings. This paper describes the theoretical context of this work, the evaluation methodology, and presents the principal results.

PMID: 22874155 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Evaluation of automated term groupings for detecting anaphylactic shock signals for drugs.

GDeClerck_pubmed - Wed, 01/23/2013 - 05:45

Evaluation of automated term groupings for detecting anaphylactic shock signals for drugs.

AMIA Annu Symp Proc. 2012;2012:882-90

Authors: Souvignet J, Declerck G, Trombert B, Rodrigues JM, Jaulent MC, Bousquet C

Abstract
Signal detection in pharmacovigilance should take into account all terms related to a medical concept rather than a single term. We built an OWL-DL file with formal definitions of MedDRA and SNOMED-CT concepts and performed two queries, Query 1 and 2, to retrieve narrow and broad terms within the Standard MedDRA Query (SMQ) related to 'anaphylactic shock' and the terms from the High Level Term (HLT) grouping related to 'anaphylaxis'. We compared values of the EB05 (EBGM) statistical test for disproportionality with 50 active ingredients randomly selected in the public version of the FDA pharmacovigilance database. Coefficient of correlation was R(2) = 1.00 between Query 1 and HLT; R(2) = 0.98 between Query 1 and SMQ narrow; R(2) = 0.89 between Query 2 and SMQ Narrow+Broad. Generating automated groupings of terms for signal detection is feasible but requires additional efforts in modeling MedDRA terms in order to improve precision and recall of these groupings.

PMID: 23304363 [PubMed - in process]

High-throughput 2D root system phenotyping platform facilitates genetic analysis of root growth and development.

S-McCouch PubMed Feed - Tue, 11/13/2012 - 05:45

High-throughput 2D root system phenotyping platform facilitates genetic analysis of root growth and development.

Plant Cell Environ. 2012 Aug 5;

Authors: Clark RT, Famoso AN, Zhao K, Shaff JE, Craft EJ, Bustamante CD, McCouch SR, Aneshansley DJ, Kochian LV

Abstract
High-throughput phenotyping of root systems requires a combination of specialized techniques and adaptable plant growth, root imaging and software tools. A custom phenotyping platform was designed to capture images of whole root systems, and novel software tools were developed to process and analyze these images. The platform and its components are adaptable to a wide range root phenotyping studies using diverse growth systems (hydroponics, paper pouches, gel and soil) involving several plant species, including, but not limited to rice, maize, sorghum, tomato and Arabidopsis. The RootReader2D software tool is free and publicly available and was designed with both user-guided and automated features that increase flexibility and enhance efficiency when measuring root growth traits from specific roots or entire root systems during large-scale phenotyping studies. To demonstrate the unique capabilities and high-throughput capacity of this phenotyping platform for studying root systems, genome-wide association studies on rice (Oryza sativa) and maize (Zea mays) root growth were performed and root traits related to aluminum (Al) tolerance were analyzed on the parents of the maize nested association mapping (NAM) population. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

PMID: 22860896 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

HopX1 in Erwinia amylovora functions as an avirulence protein in apple and is regulated by HrpL.

GDeClerck_pubmed - Fri, 08/10/2012 - 05:45
Related Articles

HopX1 in Erwinia amylovora functions as an avirulence protein in apple and is regulated by HrpL.

J Bacteriol. 2012 Feb;194(3):553-60

Authors: Bocsanczy AM, Schneider DJ, DeClerck GA, Cartinhour S, Beer SV

Abstract
Fire blight is a devastating disease of rosaceous plants caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora. This pathogen delivers virulence proteins into host cells utilizing the type III secretion system (T3SS). Expression of the T3SS and of translocated and secreted substrates is activated by the alternative sigma factor HrpL, which recognizes hrp box promoters upstream of regulated genes. A collection of hidden Markov model (HMM) profiles was used to identify putative hrp boxes in the genome sequence of Ea273, a highly virulent strain of E. amylovora. Among potential virulence factors preceded by putative hrp boxes, two genes previously known as Eop3 and Eop2 were characterized. The presence of functionally active hrp boxes upstream of these two genes was confirmed by β-glucuronidase (GUS) assays. Deletion mutants of the latter candidate genes, renamed hopX1(Ea) and hopAK1(Ea), respectively, did not differ in virulence from the wild-type strain when assayed in pear fruit and apple shoots. The hopX1(Ea) deletion mutant of Ea273, complemented with a plasmid overexpressing hopX1(E)(a), suppressed the development of the hypersensitivity response (HR) when inoculated into Nicotiana benthamiana; however, it contributed to HR in Nicotiana tabacum and significantly reduced the progress of disease in apple shoots, suggesting that HopX1(Ea) may act as an avirulence protein in apple shoots.

PMID: 22123252 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Gramene database in 2010: updates and extensions.

GDeClerck_pubmed - Fri, 08/10/2012 - 05:45
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Gramene database in 2010: updates and extensions.

Nucleic Acids Res. 2011 Jan;39(Database issue):D1085-94

Authors: Youens-Clark K, Buckler E, Casstevens T, Chen C, Declerck G, Derwent P, Dharmawardhana P, Jaiswal P, Kersey P, Karthikeyan AS, Lu J, McCouch SR, Ren L, Spooner W, Stein JC, Thomason J, Wei S, Ware D

Abstract
Now in its 10th year, the Gramene database (http://www.gramene.org) has grown from its primary focus on rice, the first fully-sequenced grass genome, to become a resource for major model and crop plants including Arabidopsis, Brachypodium, maize, sorghum, poplar and grape in addition to several species of rice. Gramene began with the addition of an Ensembl genome browser and has expanded in the last decade to become a robust resource for plant genomics hosting a wide array of data sets including quantitative trait loci (QTL), metabolic pathways, genetic diversity, genes, proteins, germplasm, literature, ontologies and a fully-structured markers and sequences database integrated with genome browsers and maps from various published studies (genetic, physical, bin, etc.). In addition, Gramene now hosts a variety of web services including a Distributed Annotation Server (DAS), BLAST and a public MySQL database. Twice a year, Gramene releases a major build of the database and makes interim releases to correct errors or to make important updates to software and/or data.

PMID: 21076153 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Bioinformatics-enabled identification of the HrpL regulon and type III secretion system effector proteins of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448A.

GDeClerck_pubmed - Fri, 08/10/2012 - 05:45
Related Articles

Bioinformatics-enabled identification of the HrpL regulon and type III secretion system effector proteins of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448A.

Mol Plant Microbe Interact. 2006 Nov;19(11):1193-206

Authors: Vencato M, Tian F, Alfano JR, Buell CR, Cartinhour S, DeClerck GA, Guttman DS, Stavrinides J, Joardar V, Lindeberg M, Bronstein PA, Mansfield JW, Myers CR, Collmer A, Schneider DJ

Abstract
The ability of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola to cause halo blight of bean is dependent on its ability to translocate effector proteins into host cells via the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (Hrp) type III secretion system (T3SS). To identify genes encoding type III effectors and other potential virulence factors that are regulated by the HrpL alternative sigma factor, we used a hidden Markov model, weight matrix model, and type III targeting-associated patterns to search the genome of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448A, which recently was sequenced to completion. We identified 44 high-probability putative Hrp promoters upstream of genes encoding the core T3SS machinery, 27 candidate effectors and related T3SS substrates, and 10 factors unrelated to the Hrp system. The expression of 13 of these candidate HrpL regulon genes was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and all were found to be upregulated by HrpL. Six of the candidate type III effectors were assayed for T3SS-dependent translocation into plant cells using the Bordetella pertussis calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase (Cya) translocation reporter, and all were translocated. PSPPH1855 (ApbE-family protein) and PSPPH3759 (alcohol dehydrogenase) have no apparent T3SS-related function; however, they do have homologs in the model strain P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (PSPTO2105 and PSPTO0834, respectively) that are similarly upregulated by HrpL. Mutations were constructed in the DC3000 homologs and found to reduce bacterial growth in host Arabidopsis leaves. These results establish the utility of the bioinformatic or candidate gene approach to identifying effectors and other genes relevant to pathogenesis in P. syringae genomes.

PMID: 17073302 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Whole-genome expression profiling defines the HrpL regulon of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, allows de novo reconstruction of the Hrp cis clement, and identifies novel coregulated genes.

GDeClerck_pubmed - Fri, 08/10/2012 - 05:45
Related Articles

Whole-genome expression profiling defines the HrpL regulon of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, allows de novo reconstruction of the Hrp cis clement, and identifies novel coregulated genes.

Mol Plant Microbe Interact. 2006 Nov;19(11):1167-79

Authors: Ferreira AO, Myers CR, Gordon JS, Martin GB, Vencato M, Collmer A, Wehling MD, Alfano JR, Moreno-Hagelsieb G, Lamboy WF, DeClerck G, Schneider DJ, Cartinhour SW

Abstract
Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 is a model pathogen of tomato and Arabidopsis that uses a hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (Hrp) type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver virulence effector proteins into host cells. Expression of the Hrp system and many effector genes is activated by the HrpL alternative sigma factor. Here, an open reading frame-specific whole-genome microarray was constructed for DC3000 and used to comprehensively identify genes that are differentially expressed in wild-type and deltahrpL strains. Among the genes whose differential regulation was statistically significant, 119 were upregulated and 76 were downregulated in the wild-type compared with the deltahrpL strain. Hierarchical clustering revealed a subset of eight genes that were upregulated particularly rapidly. Gibbs sampling of regions upstream of HrpL-activated operons revealed the Hrp promoter as the only identifiable regulatory motif and supported an iterative refinement involving real-time polymerase chain reaction testing of additional HrpL-activated genes and refinements in a hidden Markov model that can be used to predict Hrp promoters in P. syringae strains. This iterative bioinformatic-experimental approach to a comprehensive analysis of the HrpL regulon revealed a mix of genes controlled by HrpL, including those encoding most type III effectors, twin-arginine transport (TAT) substrates, other regulatory proteins, and proteins involved in the synthesis or metabolism of phytohormones, phytotoxins, and myo-inositol. This analysis provides an extensively verified, robust method for predicting Hrp promoters in P. syringae genomes, and it supports subsequent identification of effectors and other factors that likely are important to the host-specific virulence of P. syringae.

PMID: 17073300 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Development and mapping of 2240 new SSR markers for rice (Oryza sativa L.) (supplement).

GDeClerck_pubmed - Fri, 08/10/2012 - 05:45
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Development and mapping of 2240 new SSR markers for rice (Oryza sativa L.) (supplement).

DNA Res. 2002 Dec 31;9(6):257-79

Authors: McCouch SR, Teytelman L, Xu Y, Lobos KB, Clare K, Walton M, Fu B, Maghirang R, Li Z, Xing Y, Zhang Q, Kono I, Yano M, Fjellstrom R, DeClerck G, Schneider D, Cartinhour S, Ware D, Stein L

PMID: 12597280 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Development and mapping of 2240 new SSR markers for rice (Oryza sativa L.).

GDeClerck_pubmed - Fri, 08/10/2012 - 05:45
Related Articles

Development and mapping of 2240 new SSR markers for rice (Oryza sativa L.).

DNA Res. 2002 Dec 31;9(6):199-207

Authors: McCouch SR, Teytelman L, Xu Y, Lobos KB, Clare K, Walton M, Fu B, Maghirang R, Li Z, Xing Y, Zhang Q, Kono I, Yano M, Fjellstrom R, DeClerck G, Schneider D, Cartinhour S, Ware D, Stein L

Abstract
A total of 2414 new di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide non-redundant SSR primer pairs, representing 2240 unique marker loci, have been developed and experimentally validated for rice (Oryza sativa L.). Duplicate primer pairs are reported for 7% (174) of the loci. The majority (92%) of primer pairs were developed in regions flanking perfect repeats > or = 24 bp in length. Using electronic PCR (e-PCR) to align primer pairs against 3284 publicly sequenced rice BAC and PAC clones (representing about 83% of the total rice genome), 65% of the SSR markers hit a BAC or PAC clone containing at least one genetically mapped marker and could be mapped by proxy. Additional information based on genetic mapping and "nearest marker" information provided the basis for locating a total of 1825 (81%) of the newly designed markers along rice chromosomes. Fifty-six SSR markers (2.8%) hit BAC clones on two or more different chromosomes and appeared to be multiple copy. The largest proportion of SSRs in this data set correspond to poly(GA) motifs (36%), followed by poly(AT) (15%) and poly(CCG) (8%) motifs. AT-rich microsatellites had the longest average repeat tracts, while GC-rich motifs were the shortest. In combination with the pool of 500 previously mapped SSR markers, this release makes available a total of 2740 experimentally confirmed SSR markers for rice, or approximately one SSR every 157 kb.

PMID: 12597276 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Computational and experimental analysis of microsatellites in rice (Oryza sativa L.): frequency, length variation, transposon associations, and genetic marker potential.

GDeClerck_pubmed - Fri, 08/10/2012 - 05:45
Related Articles

Computational and experimental analysis of microsatellites in rice (Oryza sativa L.): frequency, length variation, transposon associations, and genetic marker potential.

Genome Res. 2001 Aug;11(8):1441-52

Authors: Temnykh S, DeClerck G, Lukashova A, Lipovich L, Cartinhour S, McCouch S

Abstract
A total of 57.8 Mb of publicly available rice (Oryza sativa L.) DNA sequence was searched to determine the frequency and distribution of different simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in the genome. SSR loci were categorized into two groups based on the length of the repeat motif. Class I, or hypervariable markers, consisted of SSRs > or =20 bp, and Class II, or potentially variable markers, consisted of SSRs > or =12 bp <20 bp. The occurrence of Class I SSRs in end-sequences of EcoRI- and HindIII-digested BAC clones was one SSR per 40 Kb, whereas in continuous genomic sequence (represented by 27 fully sequenced BAC and PAC clones), the frequency was one SSR every 16 kb. Class II SSRs were estimated to occur every 3.7 kb in BAC ends and every 1.9 kb in fully sequenced BAC and PAC clones. GC-rich trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) were most abundant in protein-coding portions of ESTs and in fully sequenced BACs and PACs, whereas AT-rich TNRs showed no such preference, and di- and tetranucleotide repeats were most frequently found in noncoding, intergenic regions of the rice genome. Microsatellites with poly(AT)n repeats represented the most abundant and polymorphic class of SSRs but were frequently associated with the Micropon family of miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) and were difficult to amplify. A set of 200 Class I SSR markers was developed and integrated into the existing microsatellite map of rice, providing immediate links between the genetic, physical, and sequence-based maps. This contribution brings the number of microsatellite markers that have been rigorously evaluated for amplification, map position, and allelic diversity in Oryza spp. to a total of 500.

PMID: 11483586 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Complete genome sequence of the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora strain ATCC 49946.

GDeClerck_pubmed - Fri, 08/10/2012 - 05:45
Related Articles

Complete genome sequence of the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora strain ATCC 49946.

J Bacteriol. 2010 Apr;192(7):2020-1

Authors: Sebaihia M, Bocsanczy AM, Biehl BS, Quail MA, Perna NT, Glasner JD, DeClerck GA, Cartinhour S, Schneider DJ, Bentley SD, Parkhill J, Beer SV

Abstract
Erwinia amylovora causes the economically important disease fire blight that affects rosaceous plants, especially pear and apple. Here we report the complete genome sequence and annotation of strain ATCC 49946. The analysis of the sequence and its comparison with sequenced genomes of closely related enterobacteria revealed signs of pathoadaptation to rosaceous hosts.

PMID: 20118253 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

("1988"[Publication Date] : "3000"[Publication Date]) AND (McCouch S[Author]); +96 new citations

S-McCouch PubMed Feed - Wed, 07/25/2012 - 16:45

96 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results:

("1988"[Publication Date] : "3000"[Publication Date]) AND (McCouch S[Author])

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Resequencing 50 accessions of cultivated and wild rice yields markers for identifying agronomically important genes.

S-McCouch PubMed Feed - Wed, 07/25/2012 - 15:45
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Resequencing 50 accessions of cultivated and wild rice yields markers for identifying agronomically important genes.

Nat Biotechnol. 2012 Jan;30(1):105-11

Authors: Xu X, Liu X, Ge S, Jensen JD, Hu F, Li X, Dong Y, Gutenkunst RN, Fang L, Huang L, Li J, He W, Zhang G, Zheng X, Zhang F, Li Y, Yu C, Kristiansen K, Zhang X, Wang J, Wright M, McCouch S, Nielsen R, Wang J, Wang W

Abstract
Rice is a staple crop that has undergone substantial phenotypic and physiological changes during domestication. Here we resequenced the genomes of 40 cultivated accessions selected from the major groups of rice and 10 accessions of their wild progenitors (Oryza rufipogon and Oryza nivara) to >15 × raw data coverage. We investigated genome-wide variation patterns in rice and obtained 6.5 million high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) after excluding sites with missing data in any accession. Using these population SNP data, we identified thousands of genes with significantly lower diversity in cultivated but not wild rice, which represent candidate regions selected during domestication. Some of these variants are associated with important biological features, whereas others have yet to be functionally characterized. The molecular markers we have identified should be valuable for breeding and for identifying agronomically important genes in rice.

PMID: 22158310 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Genome-wide association mapping reveals a rich genetic architecture of complex traits in Oryza sativa.

S-McCouch PubMed Feed - Wed, 07/25/2012 - 15:45
Related Articles

Genome-wide association mapping reveals a rich genetic architecture of complex traits in Oryza sativa.

Nat Commun. 2011;2:467

Authors: Zhao K, Tung CW, Eizenga GC, Wright MH, Ali ML, Price AH, Norton GJ, Islam MR, Reynolds A, Mezey J, McClung AM, Bustamante CD, McCouch SR

Abstract
Asian rice, Oryza sativa is a cultivated, inbreeding species that feeds over half of the world's population. Understanding the genetic basis of diverse physiological, developmental, and morphological traits provides the basis for improving yield, quality and sustainability of rice. Here we show the results of a genome-wide association study based on genotyping 44,100 SNP variants across 413 diverse accessions of O. sativa collected from 82 countries that were systematically phenotyped for 34 traits. Using cross-population-based mapping strategies, we identified dozens of common variants influencing numerous complex traits. Significant heterogeneity was observed in the genetic architecture associated with subpopulation structure and response to environment. This work establishes an open-source translational research platform for genome-wide association studies in rice that directly links molecular variation in genes and metabolic pathways with the germplasm resources needed to accelerate varietal development and crop improvement.

PMID: 21915109 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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